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VP Innovation at Axway, Co-founder at Vordel

Mark O'Neill

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Top Stories by Mark O'Neill

James Urquhart has assembled a very impressive list of examples of Cloud Computing in practice. Examples include: Number of applications running on Force.com: 135,000 Number of applications hosted by Ruby on Rails platform service vendor Heroku: 40,000+ Objects stored in Amazon Web Services S3: 64 billion (as of August 2009) Full details at: http://news.cnet.com/8301-19413_3-10405895-240.html ... (more)

Replacing Walls and PDFs with Conversation and Videos

James Governor from Redmonk has a piece yesterday about how companies often don't "get it" that people do not want to register for PDFs, or even deal with PDFs in the first place. He says that "Text is the language of the Net. It’s the language of blogs". I agree, but I would add that video is also a key language of the Net. Want to see how the Vordel Gateway works with Oracle Entitlements Server? Here's a video on YouTube showing it. And here is a blog post by my colleague Josh about the Vordel / Oracle Entitlements Server interop. Text and video. All Google searchable. And no r... (more)

Enterprise APIs and Public APIs

Over at APIEvangelist.com, Kin Lane has a great list of "Successful APIs to look at when planning your API". These include Ebay and Flickr. It's a great list, showing how APIs can be very different from each other. Some are OData-y (Ebay), some still support SOAP as well as REST (e.g. Amazon), and some are closer to REST Nirvana than others [if you want to make a RESTafarian's head explode, show them Flickr's delete operation which uses a POST.]. But one thing all these APIs have in common is that information about them is publicly available, to anyone, and anyone with the right ... (more)

Look Beyond The Mobile or Web Client To The Internet of Things

Kin Lane, the API Evangelist, has produced a list of the Ten API Commandments for Providers. It's a very good list, including privacy, security, and documentation. I encourage everyone to read it and comment. What about the corresponding list for API Consumers? Although I don't want to compare myself to a biblical figure (or indeed to Kin Lane :) ), here is my crack at a list of API commandments for consumers: 1. Protect your API Keys. API Keys are often issued to developers through an API Portal to use in their apps. These API Key allow developers to access apps. Sometimes the key... (more)

Protecting API Keys By @Axway | @CloudExpo [#API]

Back in 2011, while CTO at Vordel (API security/management vendor which was acquired by Axway in 2012), I wrote a piece for the Cloud Security Alliance blog entitled "Protect the API Keys to your Cloud Kingdom". In it, I talked about the importance of protecting API Keys. I wrote that: API Keys must be protected just like passwords and private keys are protected. This means that they should not be stored as files on the file system, or baked into non-obfuscated applications that can be analyzed relatively easily. https://blog.cloudsecurityalliance.org/2011/04/18/protect-the-api-ke... (more)